It Doesn’t Rain, It Pours!

After feeling like we were treading water for a couple of months, waiting for the rain we needed to get things rolling, “things” being the veggies and crop mostly, May was everything we needed.  Most of the good rain came at the end of the month, but there was enough at the start and during to get us going.

Nothing for a long time, and then enough rain to make a temporary pond. At least the ducks were impressed.

Nothing for a long time, and then enough rain to make a temporary pond. At least the ducks were impressed.

Over the month we managed to finish planting out The Patch.  This involved finishing up with some carrots, parsnips, cauliflower, broccoli, artichokes, various herbs and a couple of strawberry plants.

At the same time, the onions and garlic planted was all up and looking awesome.

We also planted out some berries.  Only one had made it through the hottest January in recorded history, so we got 10 more – two each of loganberry, black berry, blue berry, boysenberry, and raspberry.  Planting them in May will give them a full two extra months to get established before hitting the hot weather. This is also apparently due to be quite a wet Winter, so we might be good.

Trying the berries earlier this year to avoid South Australia's insane summers.

Trying the berries earlier this year to avoid South Australia’s insane summers.

The weather ended up being perfect the crop too, and we got it in a couple of weeks earlier than last year.  This year we went for our own blend for grazing. Our original plan had been to try and feed a small stock of meat animals, probably sheep, mostly off of what we could grow ourselves. We learned early on that our two acre crop is never going to produce enough for that, and so changed tack a little.  Now we’ll try and grow enough of a grazing crop for our milk animal, and depend on selling pigs to cover the cost of feeding the meat animals.

We went for a blend of barley, oats, and peas.  We wanted rye rather than barley, but it proved a little tough to get.  Last year we planted wheat, and put in 60kg.  That was at a slightly higher rate than is normally planted, and it came up quite thickly. This year we planted 60kg of each of the 3 grains, giving us three times the coverage.  I’m expecting big things…

The fixings for our second crop - 180kg of awesome.

The fixings for our second crop – 180kg of awesome.

Our farm equipment is miniature, much like our farm.

Our farm equipment is miniature, much like our farm.

It's surprising how quickly it grows.

It’s surprising how quickly it grows.

Just peeking through.

Just peeking through.

Even with all of this activity, we managed to get a heap of other things done.  We trimmed back the border trees both between us and Farmer John and down the eastern edge of the back paddock.  This is just basic maintenance, but it’s amazing how much wood it produces.

The animals "helping".

The animals “helping”.

For some reason, goats insist on being at the highest point they can get.

For some reason, goats insist on being at the highest point they can get.

Sheldon hauling our loot.

Sheldon hauling our loot.

We also had another near-miss farm accident.  The ride-on wouldn’t start after we loaded the trailer it was towing with wood.  I towed it and trailer back with the tractor, and didn’t realise it had no brakes.  The carry-all was half raised, I slowed down halfway down the driveway, and it ran into the back of the tractor. The carry-all busted all of the faring off, and almost crushed dad. Without the faring, dad may have been crushed between against the carry-all. It was a little scary.

In hindsight, I probably should have lowered the carry-all before towing dad.

In hindsight, I probably should have lowered the carry-all before towing dad.

Poor ride-on. It still works like a champ though.

Poor ride-on. It still works like a champ though.

There was also some more fence-building, and potentially the last fence that we need to build from scratch.  We need an area to lock away the cows, and future stock, from the crop. We chose to run a fence north-south near the western edge of the back paddock. This gives the stock a heap of cover under the giant pine-trees, and keeps them close-at-hand.

We put in another 3.6m farm fence opposite the one letting out from the backyard, but closing against the far edge of The Patch’s fence.  We ended up running 3 electric strands and 5 single strands, and still have trouble keeping the stupid goats in. We ended up locking them in a spare pig run until we work that out.

Much better than using a wheel barrow.

Site survey and set up.

Site survey and set up.

The animals doing their own site survey.

The animals doing their own site survey.

Three-way box section.

Three-way box section.

Other box section.

Other box section.

Getting there...

Getting there…

This is more a gratuitous tractor shot than anything else.

This is more a gratuitous tractor shot than anything else.

Done!

Done!

The last of the cement pads was finished in the pig runs.  This is the 5th we’ve done, and Linhda tells me I’m crazy to post pictures of each of them, mainly because they all look the same. However, there’s a lot of hard work goes into cementing, so I’m going to post proof of it. Enjoy…

Shuttering up.

Shuttering up.

Cement in.

Cement in.

Done!

Done!

We had a small bonfire, which I’m guessing will become an annual event around this time of year just to clean up any accumulated crap we have hanging around. This one was interesting though.  It had a heap of well-dried leafy gum limbs, though they were a bit damp from being out. Linhda used one match to light one gum leaf, just to see how well it would take. The results were fairly amazing, and it grew to a nice-sized blaze in no time. Just goes to show how easily bushfires can start…

We used one match on one leaf to see how quickly it'd take...

We used one match on one leaf to see how quickly it’d take…

...as it turns out, it took pretty quickly.

…as it turns out, it took pretty quickly.

This was only a couple of minutes on.

This was only a couple of minutes on.

May wasn’t all about growing things and building things, it also had a nice porky theme too.  We took George to the “Other Farm” mid-month.  He was the runty one from the four boys we bought as potential baby daddies some months back. We didn’t really need the meat, but he was certainly getting no bigger and was just eating our CPG.

We’re really not that good at estimating size yet, and I guessed he’d dress out to around 30kg.  He ended up being 46kg!  We minced more than last time, put away some mince, and made about 8kg of sausages.  We tried an English Pork Sausage and a Dried Tomato mix, and both are amazing.

Our brand! Of course, the poor pig has to be dead and dressed for us to see it properly.

Our brand! Of course, the poor pig has to be dead and dressed for us to see it properly.

46kg of amazingness.

46kg of amazingness.

Best. Sausage. EVER!

Best. Sausage. EVER!

To my mind, the most exciting part of May was that we saw Boris actually end up… doing the deed with the sows.  It took about 10 minutes of fairly determined activity, and that’s without Honey struggling at all. In fact, you could tell she was eager as she stood still and even went as far as raising her tail.

My concern was that Boris would end up being too short, as the girls are significantly bigger. I wanted him to be smaller though, as that should extend his breeding life.  Still, we weren’t sure if the angle-of-the-dangle would work. As it turns out, it works perfectly, and I have the pictures to prove it.

Boris doing his job... and probably really enjoying it...

Boris doing his job… and probably really enjoying it…

We had the last Sunday of the month off, which I think is our second weekend day with no farm work. It wasn’t my idea, and I’m still not sure how I feel about it.

That picture doesn't look a thing like Bruce...

That picture doesn’t look a thing like Bruce…

There is love-handles, and then there is this.

There is love-handles, and then there is this.

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