August 2012 Facebook Farm Statuses

  • Just picked up our third lot of chooks/ducks. We tried it a little differently this time – free-ranged over a smaller area, kept the food up to them a bit more, kept them a week or so longer. The smallest is over 3kg and the biggest is over 4kg. They’re so big that the guy who runs the poultry processing place came out to ask me about them. And then he charged me extra. On a related note, we need to go and get a new freezer tomorrow…
  • Planning a veggie patch so large that you need to use a huge rotary hoe may be ambitious. Realising that you need to use your tractor might push it to over-ambitious. Ending up having to get your farmer neighbour to use his giant tractor might push it firmly into the realms of the ridiculous. On a related note, we’re good to fence off our housing-block sized veggie patch this weekend. WooHoo!
  • For the curious amongst you, yes, a chainsaw IS a precision fencing instrument.
  • Linhda set fire to the compost bays. Again.
Linhda set fire to the compost bay. Again.

Linhda set fire to the compost bay. Again.

The Patch Lives!!!!!

August was huge because it’s when we breathed life into The Patch! The Patch is our largest veggie area, and is a little over 300 square metres, with about 250 of that being productive and the rest being paths and compost bins etc.

It was a long process, and took most of the month, but is the backbone of our veggie self-sufficiency.

It all started with the chook poop. We had a heap delivered  and may have overestimated. I basically had them deliver the biggest load they do, and it turned out to be too much by at least a factor of 2. We tried to get Sheldon (our tractor) and our disk plough through it, but it was too thick and greasy. If we had enough weight on the plough to dig in, then Sheldon would just spin his wheels. If Sheldon could pull the plough, then it was just rolling across the top.

My solution was to plan a weekend of my wheelbarrow, my sturdiest shovel, and my iPod, and move half of the chook crap someplace else. I was about 10 minutes into this less-than-awesome idea when I felt a tap on my shoulder. Farmer John had seen what I was doing, couldn’t get my attention because of the iPod part of my plan, and so had jumped the fence to get my attention. He offered his “small tractor” to help. God bless him.

Farmer John's "small tractor".

Farmer John’s “small tractor”.

Playing in this thing was insane fun!

Playing in this thing was insane fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What would have taken me the entire weekend was done in 20 minutes. After that, Farmer John brought in his “Little Tractor” and ripped the area for us.  I repeat: God bless Farmer John.

Dad and I then spent an entire weekend fencing it. My original plan was to make a rabbit-proof fence around The Patch. Farmer John dissuaded us though, saying that there hadn’t been any rabbits in the area for years. That turned out to be ironic, but saved us some work and time.

Building the fence around The Patch

Building the fence around The Patch

Box section for straining. We are pros at this now!

Box section for straining. We are pros at this now!

Dad in action!

Dad in action!

Hanging the gate on The Patch.

Hanging the gate on The Patch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fence between the back yard and The Patch was your typical, run-down, barbed wire strewn monstrosity.

This old farm fence had to go.

This old farm fence had to go.

It bothered me, and I wanted to replace it with an electric fence. Unlike the fence we’d put around our backyard veggie patch, I wanted something lower. We went for smaller droppers and it turned out great! Being low means it brings The Patch and the back yard together.

Old fence gone!

Old fence gone!

Old fence replaced!

Old fence replaced!

The Patch fleshed out.

The Patch fleshed out.

The Patch is looking good!

The Patch is looking good!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was a lot of work that we’d not originally planned on, but was well worth it.

I had to move this crap...

I had to move this crap…

And this crap...

And this crap…

And had planned to use this...

And had planned to use this…

Until dad suggested I use this...

Until dad suggested I use this…

It was a much better idea.

It was a much better idea.

When the fences were sorted, I mapped out the beds by digging paths between them. The original plan was to have half metre paths, but they ended up closer to 300mm (1 foot).

Mapping out the beds.

Mapping out the beds.

Still mapping out the beds.

Still mapping out the beds.

Seriously, it never ends...

Seriously, it never ends…

I then spent an entire day planting out the beds, including cucumbers, zucchini, tomatoes, broccoli, cabbage, potatoes, celery, spinach, and silver beet. At most I got a fifth of the way through.

The Patch partly planted!

The Patch partly planted!

It’s hard to overstate just how important The Patch is to our little venture. It’s also hard to overstate just how much work went into getting it set up.

This $90k housing block is smaller than The Patch. True story.

This $90k housing block is smaller than The Patch. True story.

The lower electric fence for The Patch inspired us for the other two veggie patches in the backyard. We ended up repeating it for those two beds.

Replaced the taller electric fence with a shorter one. It's much prettier.

Replaced the taller electric fence with a shorter one. It’s much prettier.

The larger backyard veggie patch is coming on nicely!

The larger backyard veggie patch is coming on nicely!

The smaller backyard veggie patch is finally dog proof.

The smaller backyard veggie patch is finally dog proof.

The lower fences are really quite attractive, and they keep the dogs out of the veggies.

At the same time, I set up a small hothouse and planted out some veggies and herbs in preparation for the warmer seasons.  I planted:

  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Dill
  • Pumpkin x 2
  • Tomatoes x 3 (black Russian, roma, grosse lisse)
  • Basil
  • Oregano
  • Chillies (Jalapeno, Naga, Cayenne)

We also bought and planted a couple more fruit trees:

  • Golden Queen Peach
  • Coe’s Golden Drop Plum

August wasn’t all about veggies though. We also got our third lot of chooks done, along with a couple of home-bred ducks.  This was, hands down, our largest poultry success. The smallest chook was over 3kg, while the largest were over 4kg. They were so large that the man that runs the processing facility came out to talk to me about them and ask how we did it, and then to tell me that he’d have to charge me extra because of their size. Bastard.

Chooks close to the size of turkeys. I say that means we're doing something right...

Chooks close to the size of turkeys. I say that means we’re doing something right…

As important as this all was for our veggie and meat self-sufficiency, the last thing in August was equally exciting. I got a new axe!

$100 well spent. Seriously, this is a work of art!

$100 well spent. Seriously, this is a work of art!

More Critters? MORE?!

Our rabbit has grown into rabbits. Apparently they do that. Our neighbour says that there’s been no rabbits in the area for years, and I suspect that 400 square metres of veggie patch has something to do with them now.  We’ve seen one in The Patch (the largest veggie patch) once. As destructive as they can be, he really hasn’t done any noticeable damage. We’re now waiting for them to get bigger after which Farmer John says he’ll shoot them for us. I’m thinking game pie…

We also have quail! Quail are tricky, as they’re super prone to predation. Mostly running around a field makes you an easy target for things like cats. Our two cats are kept inside, and the quail have moved in to feast on the crop. I have fond memories of quails living in country fields from when I was a kid, and I was stoked to see them move in here. Well, apart from last week when one of them burst out of my pumpkin patch from under foot. That time I almost needed a change of shorts.

July 2012 Facebook Farm Statuses

  • Today we hire a cherry-picker to thin some of the big gums high up so we can expand our fruit orchard. Apparently normal farm work doesn’t give me enough near-miss death experiences, so today I will be 10+ metres in the air using a chainsaw…
  • So somebody either hit my dog and didn’t stop or they snatched him and he jumped from their fast moving vehicle (it looks more like the later). Either way, he’s broken both ulna and radius on his right leg right through and needs about $4k worth of surgery. Two things strike me about this: 1. Bruce was running towards me when I found him. Not limping. Not trotting. He was *running* with a leg broken completely through. He ran home, took a midnight ride to the vet, was examined, had three shots, and was calm and didn’t make a single noise the entire time. What the hell is that dog made out of?! 2. There’s some bastard who lives in Wasleys who I’d like to meet.
  • Bruce is home!!!! Our furry family is complete! I had the vet burn me copies of the x-rays, which I’ll post later. They are freaking awesome!
  • There are a *lot* of birds in the country, and I don’t think a single one of them sleeps in. Who knew?
  • We finished our first round of fruit-bearing plants today. We have a total of 54, 51 of which we’ve bought. And I don’t think we’re finished… 🙂
  • Home-made stock with home-grown chooks and veggies. Then home-made risotto with home-made stock and all home-grown veggies. Give us a couple of years and the chorizo and cheese will be home-made too. The rice, on the other hand, might always be beyond us… 🙂
  • We had a contractor show up today wearing glasses, where last week he was here without glasses. Linhda was convinced they were different people, proving conclusively that Clarke Kent’s disguise may actually have worked.
  • Our new solar system is in and running! 24 panels and a 5kW inverter will hopefully mean we never pay another cent. The new meter doesn’t go in until the end of September, but in the meantime the old one is running backwards. 🙂

 

1 trap, 2 traps, 3 traps, whatever it takes.

1 trap, 2 traps, 3 traps, whatever it takes.

 

Wood, More Wood, a Broken Bruce, and Poetic Justice…

July was a big month for wood. Trust me when I say that cutting wood is much more fun at temperatures in the teens rather than temperatures in the 30s and 40s…

First of all, we dropped one of the big pines in the back paddock. It was leaning way over, and had to come down in a controlled way. It came down nicely and gave us a heap of useable wood.

The leeny pine is down!

The leeny pine is down!

It really was quite large...

It really was quite large…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a related story, and what could be seen as poetic justice when you consider the fact that I was killing a big tree, my new chainsaw got stuck. I was cutting through the main trunk after the tree was down when one of the limbs dug in to the ground and twisted unexpectedly. I’d expected it to drop down cleanly, and the twist stuck my chainsaw fast.  I had to go old school and use an axe to free the saw.

Poor stuck chainsaw...

Poor stuck chainsaw…

Some handy axe work was required.

Some handy axe work was required.

Chainsaw freed!

Chainsaw freed!

The biggest wood project was hiring a cherry picker over a weekend to thin out the orchard area.  It’s a third to half an acre, which is the perfect size for what we want, but was crowded with large trees, cutting the light drastically. We’d spent a lot of time cutting out scrubby and half-dead trees, but the larger tree canopies cast shadow over most of the orchard area.  The cherry picker allowed us to selectively thin the larger trees, and open up orchard area.

Driving the cherry picker.

Driving the cherry picker.

View from the top. It doesn't really convey the terrifying sense of wobbliness.

View from the top. It doesn’t really convey the terrifying sense of wobbliness.

Tractor pulling power!

Tractor pulling power!

Using the cherry picker was interesting and often terrifying. It extended to 10 metres, and though stable it often felt anything but. The basket can theoretically hold 200 kg, but with just half of that in there (me and the equipment) it would get decidedly wobbly when doing things like starting the chainsaw. Still, it all worked out safely, was a huge day, and was incredibly productive for us.

Full extension.

Full extension.

Timber!

Timber!

Safety, thy name is me.

Safety, thy name is me.

The effort here was to create a sunny, productive orchard area. A significant benefit of this was the wood we were able to keep for both our combustion heater and our outdoor fires.

The wood quickly started piling up.

The wood quickly started piling up.

There was a poetic justice theme here also.  I was very careful when dropping limbs over the fences or gate, but still managed to (slightly) bend one of our front gates and break our sign. The damage was minor, but dad was determined to document it photographically, which he then proceeded to FaceBook…

I was trying to be careful...

I was trying to be careful…

Dad's proof that I broke the sign.

Dad’s proof that I broke the sign.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We proceeded to rearrange our wood storage, as it had quickly grown beyond our initial plans.  We took all of the leafy limbs that were too small to use inside, and stacked them in the back paddock under the pine trees for use in our outside fires.  The larger limbs were cut into useable rounds and stacked under the gorgeous pepper tree we have in our orchard area. In theory, the pepper tree should probably go, as it’s large and super shady. I love it though so it’s staying.

The farm trailer earning its keep.

The farm trailer earning its keep.

Wood pile growing...

Wood pile growing…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our wood karma wasn’t done though. I broke my favourite axe in the process of committing all of this wood carnage. It was a sad day.

I loved that axe!

I loved that axe!

July wasn’t all about cutting trees though.  We also spent a lot of time planting out our orchard.  We’d bought most of the trees in June, and finished planting them all out in July.  This included making a fence-like support for growing berries against under our newly thinned gum trees.

Planting trees, free-ranged chooks, and Bruce.

Planting trees, free-ranged chooks, and Bruce.

Berry support.

Berry support.

Bruce likes to help.

Bruce likes to help.

We ended up with 54 fruit-bearing plants, 51 of which we bought and planted. We have a heavy clay soil, and so brought in organic loam which we used to build up the area around the trees.  Planting that many trees, especially when it’s not simply digging a hole, takes a while and we spread the work over a couple of weeks.

July was the first and only time the dogs have been out the front gate, the results of which was a broken Bruce. I’d left the front gate open for Linhda, again for the first time and something I’ve never done since, and then forgotten and let the dogs out the front to pee before bed. It wasn’t five minutes later that I realised, but they were already out. I found them a kilometre or so down the road. Domino and Tatyl jumped in the car, but Bruce wouldn’t come close. I figured he knew he was in trouble and so was staying back. I let him run home besides the car, and on the way home noticed he was limping. Then I realised he wasn’t using his right front let at all. Then I saw that it was actually dangling in the breeze and pissing out blood.

Freshly broken Bruce.

Freshly broken Bruce.

Bruce feeling pitiful.

Bruce feeling pitiful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A midnight trip to the emergency vet room, followed by some work by an orthopaedic surgeon, resulted in a plate and 9 screws holding together his broken ulna and radius.

Broken ulna and radius.

Broken ulna and radius.

Plated and screwed ulna and radius.

Plated and screwed ulna and radius.

It also resulted in my being $4k poorer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Towards the end of the month we found a baby bearded dragon while grubbing out some weeds. Again, July is a good time for getting out the tough weeds. The ground is moist and it’s not 40 degrees.  Dad was digging out some old horehound and uncovered the dragon. He was young and skinny (the lizard, not dad), and would have been completely vulnerable if we left him. I put him in an old turtle tank I had, along with a heat pad designed for reptiles, with plans to let him out when the weather warmed up.

Baby dragon!

Baby dragon!

The last thing of note for July was the installation of our solar electricity generation system.  We had 24 panels with a potential generation capability of 5 ¼ kilowatt hours put in. We predict that this will make us 100% self-sufficient for electricity, in that the sunny times will generate enough credit to pay for the not-so-sunny times. Ideally we’d have a battery system in place so that we simply stored and used our own energy. That technology needs to develop more before we use it though. And by “develop more”, I mean become cheaper, because those batteries are stupidly expensive!

June 2012 Facebook Farm Statuses

  • Organised coops for two lots of meat birds, fixed up some rainwater pipes, cleared trees with my awesome chainsaw, grubbed out some trunks and rotary hoed a big addition to the veggie patch, and planted 13 fruit trees involving shovelling a ton of organic loam. AND, it took 16,500 steps according to my pedometer. My reward? Pub dinner! Yes, I will work for beer.
  • Our first crop is officially in the ground. Farm-freaking-tastic!

I had a trip to the US for work for half of June, so it was light on for both farm work and farm-related FB statuses… 😦

Lady Liberty. I'd rather have stayed home and worked on the farm...

Lady Liberty. I’d rather have stayed home and worked on the farm…

It’s All About The Produce!!!!

June was ALL about the fruit, veggies, and our first crop!

We planted out our crop early in the month. In reality, I think we’d normally aim to have the paddock ploughed and planted a month or so earlier. The rule-of-thumb is that you plough after the first big rain, which tends to be around Anzac Day (end of April). We were constrained by the fact that we had neither plough nor seeder, which just shows how forgiving this particular rule-of-thumb is.

We planted wheat, mostly because that’s what we could easily get from Farmer John.  The estimated 2 acres took about 50 or 60kg. In reality, that’s fairly heavily sown, but I think we’ll go even heavier next time.

I got a little seeder from the John Deere dealership down the road, and the ride on towed it perfectly. It has a manual release for the seed, so something bigger like the tractor would never work.

Our little seeder. Our farmer neighbour laughed a little...

Our little seeder. Our farmer neighbour laughed a little…

The big lesson learned was to run the seeder up and down the ploughed furrows, and not across them. I about bounced myself off of the ride-on countless times, and it shook the poor seeder around.

The crop is up!

The crop is up!

We also revamped the large veggie bed out in the back garden.  Most everything was ready to come up, so we harvested what was left, spent some time grubbing out the last of the stubborn trunks from the ornamentals we’d torn out, and rotary hoed it. Lastly, we dog-proofed it. Our dogs are pretty good, but three of them together tend to be bat crap crazy, and their running around had them tracking through the veggies. To get around this we put a small electric fence around the large bed.

I was trying to test the electric fence with Bruce. He was not fooled.

I was trying to test the electric fence with Bruce. He was not fooled.

Tatyl was the first dog hit by the electric fence. She was not happy.

Tatyl was the first dog hit by the electric fence. She was not happy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the painful prep was done, we planted out:

  • Garlic
  • White onions
  • Brown onions
  • Stump-rooted carrots
  • Purple carrots
  • Two kinds of radish
  • Broccoli
  • Lettuce
  • Pak Choy
  • Broad beans
  • Dwarf beans
  • Peas
  • Strawberries
Big veggie patch revamped!

Big veggie patch revamped!

You could almost hear the seeds germinating...

You could almost hear the seeds germinating…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We bought all of our fruit trees in June, though some were bought near the end and not planted out until July.  We got them in three lots, mainly because we visited three different nurseries and kept finding trees we’d not seen elsewhere.  We ended up with:

  • Sunburst Cherry
  • Stella Cherry
  • Gala Apple
  • Pink Lady Apple
  • Granny Smith Apple
  • Williams Pear
  • Goldmine Nectarine
  • Alberta Peach
  • Anzac Peach
  • Peacharine
  • Glengarry Apricot
  • Moorpark Apricot
  • Bay Tree
  • Captivator Gooseberry
  • Pomegranate
  • Verdale Olive
  • Manzanillo Olive
  • Ruby Blood Plum
  • 20th Century Nashi
  • Santa Rosa Plum
  • Satsuma Plum
  • Lemon Bergamont Pear
  • Chinese Crabapple
  • Californian Papershell Almond
  • Blood Orange
  • Indian Guava
  • Strawberry Guava
  • Redcurrant
  • Blackcurrant
  • Haywood Kiwi (male and female)
  • Brigitta Blueberry
  • Jostaberry (Blackcurrant x Gooseberry)
  • Blackberry
  • Autumn fruiting Raspberry
  • Summer fruiting Raspberry
  • Fuji Apple
  • Olives
  • Fig
  • Quince

I prefer to plant fruit trees at this time of year. You get them bare-rooted and they’re pretty much dormant. There’s less shock when you transplant them, and they have a good couple of seasons to establish before the really hot weather. They tend to be cheaper too.

Our first fruit trees.

Our first fruit trees.

Bruce "helping" plant some trees.

Bruce “helping” plant some trees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had our normal weekend fill-in project of tree trimming, which included removing some scrubby, half-dead gums.  It was a little bigger this month, as a couple were up on a higher area where the retaining wall had been built from non-treated timber. It was well built, but the wrong materials meant it was rotten and full of white ants.  We ended up pulling some of it down on accident when we were pulling some trees out, and so then we pulled some more of it down on purpose.  We plan on knocking the corner off the bank and making a more gentle slope that really doesn’t need to be retained.

Tearing down half-dead trees and a rotten wall. Farm efficiency!

Tearing down half-dead trees and a rotten wall. Farm efficiency!

The best use for the old retaining wall.

The best use for the old retaining wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lastly, we took our last two lambs and some chickens to “the other farm”. These were lambs 3 and 4, and we were old hands at it now. We did change out the cuts of meat we were getting a little, just to find what best suited us.  It took 4 lambs and 2 goats before we really got that right.

Punk sheep.

Punk sheep.

The chickens were interesting.  We’d free-ranged them over our orchard area, which means they got a ton of exercise. There was a heap of green feed, as you’d expect for that time of year, so I’d not supplemented their feed as much. The result was big birds, which were super tasty but a little tough. I think a combination of too much exercise and a lean diet made them tough.  This was an awesome learning experience for us, as it allowed us to fine tune how we keep the birds.

I swear they're half chook and half dinosaur.

I swear they’re half chook and half dinosaur.