PIGS!!!!!!!!!!

October was a huge month.  This was when we had the first blossoms come in on our new fruit trees in the orchard.

Our first blossoms!

Our first blossoms!

Our first figs!

Our first figs!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Watering that many fruit trees is a challenge. We wanted to irrigate them, but drippers are ridiculously slow when you want to deliver 10 litres or more per watering. The solution I came up with was to cut the bottoms out of 2 litre soft drink bottles, stake them under the trees, and have the irrigation dump into them.  This keeps the water pretty much where you want it, and reduces run-off. It works a treat!

My fruit tree watering solution. Patent pending.

My fruit tree watering solution. Patent pending.

Our mulberries also ripened. I was determined to use as many as we could. We put down some old curtains as drop sheets and harvested by shaking the tree. The trick is to not shake too hard, so you only get the really ripe fruit. Doing this we were able to harvest a few times, and made mulberry jam, stewed mulberries, and even tried mulberry wine (it was a terrible failure).

The mulberries ripening.

The mulberries ripening.

Harvesting the mulberries.

Harvesting the mulberries.

This is what you get for not wearing gloves.

This is what you get for not wearing gloves.

Spoiler alert, we get piglets this month...

Spoiler alert, we get piglets this month…

We also continued work in the veggie department. I had set up a small hothouse back in August  and the seedlings had come on nicely.

Seedlings coming along.

Seedlings coming along.

Many of these were planted out. In addition to that, we were seeing progress across all of our veggies, in every bed, and even in pots.

Carrots, sprouting brocolli, lettuce, broad beans.

Carrots, sprouting brocolli, lettuce, broad beans.

The broad beans went nuts!

The broad beans went nuts!

Zucchini coming along nicely!

Zucchini coming along nicely!

I'm quite proud of my Viet Mint (aka Hot Mint)

I’m quite proud of my Viet Mint (aka Hot Mint)

With the veggies coming on, and with our permaculture philosophy creating an enticing ecosystem for the local wildlife , we noticed a problem with birds. The biggest pests were pigeons getting into the leafy greens. I want to avoid too much netting, and The Patch is too big to entirely net anyway. Our solution was a scarecrow and some plastic owls we bought at the local cheap shop.

Cecil the scarecrow. Dad named him.

Cecil the scarecrow. Dad named him.

Scary Owl!

Scary Owl!

Cecil and the owl on watch.

Cecil and the owl on watch.

It’s interesting the way these work. They definitely keep the pigeons and starlings out. However, things like willy wagtails and magpies just ignore them.  That doesn’t matter at all though, as the birds that ignore our scare-tactics don’t actually hurt the plants.  We have next-to-no bird damage on our veggies, but still have a heap of birds in and around the veggie patches.

Our harvest was great too. Linhda pickled our first beetroot, which is, hands-down, no exaggeration, the best beetroot I’ve ever tasted. To the point where I horde it in the shed and only bring it out for us. I’ll normally share anything in my garden with anybody, but I go all Gollum on my precious beetroot.

Linhda also made chilli jam, which was fan-freaking-tastic.  As she was making it she said “The recipe asks for 6 chillies, so I’m going to use 15 and this habanero…”.  Needless to say, the results were spectacular!

Words cannot express the awsomeness of this chilli jam.

Words cannot express the awsomeness of this chilli jam.

We took our last goat to the “Other Farm”, and were pleased with the results. We’d fed him on a little longer, and the meat return was nice.

An after shot of our second goat.

An after shot of our second goat.

We had a couple of smaller, miscellaneous animal events also.  Firstly, the bearded dragon was released. It was warm enough and he was certainly fat and healthy enough.  I wasn’t sure where to let him go, and chose the pepper tree under which was stack our wood.

The dragon eating meal worms. He was fat, healthy, and happy.

The dragon eating meal worms. He was fat, healthy, and happy.

Letting the dragon go.

Letting the dragon go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We also had some Welcome Swallows hatch babies under the carport.  They nested right where I park my car, so I made sure to only half park it under the carport. I love those swallows, and would rather put up with some bird crap on my car than try and move them on.  It didn’t take long and we had 3 or 4 babies. It only seemed a couple of weeks later and the babies were flying, and shortly after they left. Hopefully they’re back next year…

Baby Welcome Swallows.

Baby Welcome Swallows.

Linhda and I spent nearly 2 weeks in Canberra (for my work). While we were away dad made a stock ramp.  Getting animals in and out of the trailer can be tricky, and is only going to get trickier as the size of the animals increases. With that in mind, dad and I came up with a plan, refined it a little, and then dad did most of the work while I was away. The result was perfect!

This will work in theory. Now to test it...

This will work in theory. Now to test it…

The stock ramp against the trailer.

The stock ramp against the trailer.

The stock ramp in profile.

The stock ramp in profile.

The biggest news of October, however, was pigs! We got piglets!!!!!  As explained before, my five year plan was to get pigs and a milking animal.  In September  I had started gearing up to get the materials to create the infrastructure for pigs, and in October we got them.

We found somebody selling Large Whites on gumtree .  I gave them a call and they were really very helpful. They had a smallish farm an hour or so north of us, and the pigs seemed to be how they made a bit of their income. They were more than happy to go over pig husbandry with us, and showed us around their own stock.  I got to love up on both the mother and father of our piglets, and they were so sweet!

Our babies' mum. I loved up on her lots!

Our babies’ mum. I loved up on her lots!

Our babies' dad. You can tell it's the dad by his GIANT testicles.

Our babies’ dad. You can tell it’s the dad by his GIANT testicles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Large Whites are the biggest commercial breed, and from my research they seem to be the most popular commercial breed here in Australia, as well as in the USA and the UK.  This is because of their size, as well as their large litters and the amount of milk that the mothers produce.

Pure Large Whites are apparently a rare breed though, as they are normally crossed with other breeds. For example, Large Whites are apparently not great at ham production, so some people will cross with them to increase the ham size.

The babies we got are Large Whites with a touch of Landrace in them.  I believe that they are mostly Large White, as we’ve since had other pigs that are crosses and the originals are by-and-far the largest. They also have pricked ears, which is a Large White trait, while the others have floppier ears.

Anyway, we wanted to get breeding stock, which obviously isn’t possible when all of the pigs are related. With that constraint in mind, we got two girls and one boy with the plan to breed from the girls and feed the boy on.  I named them “Honey”, “Smoked”, and “Ham”.

This is how we got them home. By four months old not one of them would fit in one of those boxes.

This is how we got them home. By four months old not one of them would fit in one of those boxes.

Porky cuteness.

Porky cuteness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The babies were around 3 weeks old when we got them.  It took maybe a day to have them eating out of my hand. They’re super inquisitive, friendly, and cute as hell.

These are three weeks old and look at how solid they are!

These are three weeks old and look at how solid they are!

Having my first scratch.

Having my first scratch.

They love leafy greens!

They love leafy greens!

 

They were skittish around me for a week or so, but never once were they scared of Bruce. Bruce is a 40kg bull mastiff x American staffy, and scares pretty much everybody he meets. Not these piglets though. They’ve always loved him.

Bruce meets the babies.

Bruce meets the babies.

That first pig buying experience was amazing. The people were knowledgeable and friendly, and you could tell just how well they cared for their animals. Yes, they raised them for money, but everything was done properly and the result was happy, healthy animals.

The flip-side to that is the second batch of pigs we bought.  Two thirds of our first purchase was breeding stock, and we wanted some that we could feed on and eat without having to wait to breed our own.  We found some “Small Whites” advertised on gumtree and they were surprisingly cheap.  We went to check them out, and found pretty much the opposite of our first experience.

This second guy was the small-holder version of a puppy farm. His place was FULL of animals – poultry, goats, sheep, a horse, pigs, dogs, kids. There was no feed left anywhere, and not even enough water.  The mother pig was quite protective of her babies, and this guy’s method of safely getting the piglets was to coax them out of a hole they’d dug under the back wall using food, block it off so the mum was trapped, and then chase the babies around an acre with a butterfly net. When he caught one, he’d race to the driveway area, being chased the whole time by four dogs, which he’d be kicking and swearing at, and two larger pigs that were free-ranging around the area. It would have been comical if it hadn’t actually been quite dangerous, not to mention distressing for the poor piglets.

We got two females from him. We wanted females so we could avoid boar taint. We’re not sure now if this is will end up being a huge problem with our pigs.  I’ll discuss that in more detail in my pig threads , but having the girls removes the risk altogether.

The new babies meeting the original babies. Luckily, pigs are pretty friendly.

The new babies meeting the original babies. Luckily, pigs are pretty friendly.

We went from planning to have pigs at around the 5 year mark to actually buying two lots within 9 months. And they’re awesome!

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